German’s top 6 most popular diets that you should know

Germany has a lot of diets with great recipes. Although these diets may be unfamiliar to non-Germans, they are worth eaten when in the country. It’s also worthy to note that some of the diets are weird and annoying. So be prepared for a surprise when eating a German diet. You can always read reviews about food companies and restaurants to patronize in Germany on Erfahrungenscout.de. For instance, if you are particular about healthy meals, you can read about ProHealth and other companies to know if they sell healthy food in Germany. Let’s take a look at the top 6 popular diets in Germany.

1.    Wurst

Wurst comes in different forms depending on the method of preparation but one of the most popular varieties is Bratwurst, a pan-fried or roasted sausage made from veal, beef, or pork. Others include Wiener (Viennese), which is smoked and then boiled, and the blood sausages, Blutwurst and Schwarzwurst are other forms.

Also available are regional specialities such as Berlin’s Currywurst (with curried ketchup on top) and Bavaria’s Weisswurst, a white sausage that you peel before eating with sweet mustard. Meanwhile, Nuremberg is famous for its grilled Rostbratwurst, which people eat with fermented shredded cabbage (sauerkraut). And in the state of Thuringian, the local Rostbratwurst is made using distinctive spices like marjoram and caraway.

2.    Rouladen

This typical German dish consists of bacon, onions, mustard, and pickles wrapped in thinly sliced beef or veal which is then cooked. Rouladen is also considered to be part of traditional Polish cuisine in the Upper Silesia region called rolada Śląska (Silesian roulade). It is also famous in the Czech Republic where it is called Španělský ptáček (Spanish bird).

While the mixture varies from region to region, beef has become popular over the last century. The cut is usually topside beef or silverware since this is the cheaper cut. This food found at festivals and family dinner tables across the country. It usually comes with dumplings, mashed potatoes, Blaukraut (cooked red cabbage), and red wine gravy.

3.    Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte

This delicious meal (which means ‘Black Forest cherry torte’). It gets its name from Schwarzwälder Kirschwasser, a liqueur distilled from tart cherries. Interestingly, German law mandates that Kirschwasser must be present in the cake for it to be labelled a Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte. Alternating layers of rich chocolate cake, cherries, and whipped cream are topped off with more cream, maraschino cherries, and chocolate shavings for a luxurious finish.

4.    Käsespätzle

Germany’s answer to pasta, Spätzle is especially popular in the southern part of the country. These soft egg noodles are made from wheat flour and egg and are often topped with cheese (Käsespätzle) and roasted onions. Although the origin of the dish is disputed and variations are found in neighbouring countries, Spätzle remains a Swabian speciality. There, the general cooking rule is to use one more egg than the number of guests. It is often served with meat dishes that use a lot of sauce or gravy, such as Rouladen, or in stews, such as Gaisburger Marsch (a Swabian stew). In some regions, the dough contains other ingredients like cherries (Kirschspätzle), apples (Apfelspätzle), liver (Leberspätzle), sauerkraut (Krautspätzle), or even beer.

5.    Eintopf

A steaming bowl of Eintopf will warm anyone up on a cold day. The name of this traditional German stew means ‘one pot’ and refers to the way of cooking rather than its contents. That said, most recipes contain the same basic ingredients: broth, vegetables, potatoes or pulses, and pork, beef, chicken, or fish. Eintopf is similar to Irish stew and you will find many different regional specialities throughout Germany. These include Lumpen und Flöh (which means ‘rags and fleas’) in the Kassel area and Linseneintopf (lentils) in Thüringen. Full of flavour and heart-warming goodness, it’s no wonder this tasty dish is one of the most popular German foods.

6.    Sauerbraten

Germans love their meat dishes, and Sauerbraten (meaning ‘sour’ or ‘pickled’ roast) is one of the country’s national dishes. You can make a pot roast by using different types of meat, which you marinate in wine, vinegar, spices.